DHS Implements New Processes for Cubans, Haitians, and Nicaraguans and Eliminates Cap for Venezuelans

Posted by Ann Badmus | Jan 06, 2023 | 0 Comments

On Jan. 5, 2023, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced a safe and lawful way for qualifying Cubans, Haitians, and Nicaraguans with U.S.-based supporters to travel by air to and temporarily reside in the United States. Individuals arriving under this new process may also apply for work authorization. DHS also announced elimination of the numerical cap for a similar process for Venezuelans announced earlier this year.

This process will provide a lawful and streamlined way for qualifying nationals of Cuba, Haiti, and Nicaragua who are outside the United States and lacking U.S. entry documents to come to the United States. Through a fully online process, individuals can be considered, on a case-by-case basis, for advance authorization to travel to the United States and seek a temporary period of parole for up to two years, provided that they:

  • Have a supporter in the United States who will provide financial and other support;
  • Undergo and clear robust security vetting;
  • Meet other eligibility criteria; and
  • Warrant a favorable exercise of discretion.

DHS will begin implementing these new processes for Cubans, Haitians, and Nicaraguans on Jan. 6, 2023. For additional information on the process and eligibility requirements, please see the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans page.

DHS strongly encourages Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans seeking entry in the U.S. who do not have and are not eligible for a visa to instead seek entry via this process, as this will be the safest and most effective way to pursue a temporary stay in the United States. Individuals complete the process electronically and should not approach the border to access this process.

Effective immediately, U.S.-based individuals may submit Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support, on behalf of named nationals of Cuba, Haiti, and Nicaragua to come to the United States. We are also continuing the process with respect to Venezuelans.

Access to these processes is free. Neither the U.S. supporter nor the beneficiary is required to pay the U.S. government a fee for the Form I-134A or participation in this process. Beware of any scams or potential exploitation by anyone who asks for money associated with applying to this process. Visit the Avoid Scams page for information and resources.

This article is provided as an educational service and is not legal advice. Consult with an attorney for your specific circumstances.  For a comprehensive evaluation of your immigration situation and options, 

you are invited to call us at 214-494-8033, text us using our chat box, or complete our contact form.

About the Author

Ann Badmus

Principal and Managing Attorney

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